Journal of Zoo Biology

Journal of Zoo Biology is an open access peer-reviewed international interdisciplinary journal focusing on original reporting, experimental and theoretical contributions to animal sciences. Quality research articles and critical reviews from around the world cover: Biodiversity, demographics, genetics, behavior, reproduction, nutrition, diseases of animals, physiological, biochemical, and molecular, ecological, genetic and economic aspects of animals are accepted for publication.

Journal of Zoo Biology is jointly published by EScience Press and Center for Community Learning (CCL) and has no affiliation with Wiley Periodicals, Inc. publishing Zoo Biology.


Journal of Zoo Biology

Journal of Zoo Biology

Editor: Dr. Fariha Latif

Publisher: EScience Press

Format: Print & Online

Print Copy Provider: EScience Press

Frequency: 01

Language: English

Scope: Zoology

Author Fees: Yes

Types of Journal: Academic/Scholarly Journal

Access: Open Access

Indexed & Abstracted: Yes

Policy: Double blind peer-reviewed

Review Time: 04-06 Weeks Approximately

Contact & Submission e-mail: zoobiol@esciencepress.net

Alternate e-mail: info@esciencepress.net

Zoology News

 

Vampire bats may coordinate with ‘friends’ over a bite to eat

Vampire bats that form bonds in captivity and continue those 'friendships' in the wild also hunt together, meeting up over a meal after independent departures from the roost, according to a new study.
Posted: 2021-09-23More...
 

Decoding birds’ brain signals into syllables of song

Researchers can predict what syllables a bird will sing -- and when it will sing them -- by reading electrical signals in its brain, reports a new study. The work is an early step toward building vocal prostheses for humans who have lost the ability to speak.
Posted: 2021-09-23More...
 

More support needed for pollination services in agriculture

The global decline of pollinators threatens the reproductive success of 90 per cent of all wild plants globally and the yield of 85 per cent of the world's most important crops. Pollinators -- mainly bees and other insects -- contribute to 35 per cent of the world's food production. The service provided by pollinators is particularly important for securing food produced by the more than two billion small farmers worldwide. An agroecologist points out that yields could be increased if pollinators were encouraged.
Posted: 2021-09-23More...
 

Non-native fish are main consumers of salmon in reservoirs

When warmwater fish species like bass, walleye and crappie that are not native to the Pacific Northwest, but prized by some anglers, overlap with baby spring chinook salmon in reservoirs in Oregon's Willamette River they consume more baby salmon than native fish per individual, new research found.
Posted: 2021-09-23More...
 

Desert teamwork explains global pattern of co-operation in birds

A new study from the Kalahari Desert finds that teamwork allows birds to cope with brutally unpredictable environments.
Posted: 2021-09-22More...
 

Vol 3, No 1 (2020): J. Zoo Biol.

Table of Contents

Research Articles

Anne L. Jansen, Karen Thodberg
PDF
01-11
Yue Min, Shibao Wu, Fuhua Zhang, Na Xu
PDF
13-20
Velmurugan Karthikeyan, Selvaraj Balachandran, Kasilingam Ramachandran, Nagarajan Rajesh, Ayyaru Gopalakrishnan
PDF
21-27
Fadia Dib, Adib A. Saad, Abdellatif Ali
PDF
29-39
Wardah Hassan, Sajid Abdullah, Naila Hadayat, Huma Naz, Shakeela Parveen
PDF
41-45