Microbes

Microbes is multidisciplinary international, open access, peer reviewed scientific journal committed to publish original research, critical reviews, and short communications, reporting theoretical, experimental, applied, and descriptive work in all aspects of microbial science.

Managing Editor: Dr. Sajjad Hyder
Country of Publication: Pakistan
Format: Print & Online
Frequency: 03
Publication Dates: April, August, December
Language: English
Author Fees: Yes
Types of Journal: Academic/Scholarly Journal
Access: Open Access
Indexed & Abstracted: Yes
Policy: Double blind peer-reviewed
Review Time: 04-06 weeks approximately
Contact & Submission e-mail: microbes@esciencepress.net
Alternate e-mail: info@esciencepress.net


Microbes

Journal Scope

The journal aims to serve the research community by providing a platform for researchers to publish quality research in both fundamental and applied microbiology. The journal considers submissions on microbes infecting or interacting with microbes, plants, animals, and humans covering the following aspects:

  • Agricultural microbiology

  • Beneficial microbes

  • computational, systems, & synthetic microbiology

  • Environmental microbiology

  • Food microbiology

  • Industrial microbiology

  • Medical & pharmaceutical microbiology

  • Microbial physiology & ecology

  • Microbial biochemistry

  • Microbial genetics & genomics

  • Microbial biotechnology

  • veterinary microbiology

 

Microbes follow guidelines by Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). Microbes takes the responsibility to enforce a rigorous peer-review together with strict ethical policies and standards to ensure to add high quality scientific works to the field of scholarly publication. Unfortunately, cases of plagiarism, data falsification, inappropriate authorship credit, and the like, do arise. Microbes takes such publishing ethics issues very seriously and our editors are trained to proceed in such cases with a zero tolerance policy. To verify the originality of content submitted to our journals, we use iThenticate to check submissions against previous publications. Microbes works with PUBLONS to provide reviewers with credit for their work.

Latest News on Microbes

 

Virus uses decoy strategy to evade immune system

Researchers have learnt more about how viruses operate and can evade the immune system and are now using their discovery to help learn more about COVID-19.
Posted: 2020-08-13More...
 

Swallowing this colonoscopy-like bacteria grabber could reveal secrets about your health

Your gut bacteria could say a lot about you, such as why you're diabetic or how you respond to certain drugs. But scientists can see only so much of the gastrointestinal tract to study the role of gut bacteria in your health. Researchers built a way to swallow a tool that acts like a colonoscopy, except that instead of looking at the colon with a camera, the technology takes samples of bacteria.
Posted: 2020-08-12More...
 

Programmed bacteria have something extra

Chemists expand the genetic code of Escherichia coli bacteria to produce a synthetic building block, a 'noncanonical amino acid' that makes it a living indicator for oxidative stress. The research is a step toward designed cells that detect disease and produce their own drugs.
Posted: 2020-08-12More...
 

Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies

More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. 'Preemies' can be severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast milk alone, so neonatal intensive care units provide an additional milk fortifier, either in the form of cow's milk or manufactured from donor breast milk, to keep them healthy.
Posted: 2020-08-12More...
 

Mutations may have saved brown howlers from yellow fever virus

From 2007 to 2009, a devastating yellow fever virus outbreak nearly decimated brown and black and gold howler monkey populations at El Parque El Piñalito in northeastern Argentina. An international research team tested if howlers who survived the outbreak had any genetic variations that may have kept them alive. In brown howlers, they found two mutations on immune genes that resulted in amino acid changes in the part of the protein that detects the disease.
Posted: 2020-08-12More...
 

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